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Life

A 8 post collection


A Father's Advice

 •  Filed under Links, Life

A wonderful piece highlighting some life lessons from a father.

Begin conversations with people on airplanes when you hear “We have begun our descent.” If they prove to be fascinating, you will broaden your world; if they prove insufferable, it’s only 15 minutes. Uber rides and chairlifts provide a similar opportunity — exposure to people you would not otherwise meet in controlled time periods.

Unsolicited Advice for My Three Sons, In No Particular Order by Rufus Griscom

It's writing like this that I love to read but going through the thousands of posts on Medium is a real problem. Another walled garden of potentially great content I guess.

The Family Business

 •  Filed under Life, Cultural Offering

Kurt's family business is ticking over nicely as the winter break comes to an end.

My wife and I joke that we operate a small business. There is the storage unit business for unused furniture, old college books, out-of-season clothing, and odd items to be collected from the attic, garage or basement at some to-be-named time in the future. There is the consulting business for reluctant “clients” who ask for advice and help just past the right time to ask. The 1:00 a.m. call from Lexington - “Derby ate a battery; what do I?” The Saturday far-away-from-home comment “the truck sounds really funny,” or the “I know” reply to “you have a tail light out” on a Saturday away from home.

The Fleet is Out by Kurt Harden

I didn't realise it until I was a parent, but you never stop being a parent. Even when the kids have grown up and left the nest, you'll always be a parent.

Our kids are still young, but I'm now curious as to what kind of "client" calls I'm going to get in the wee hours of the morning.

Spoiled for Choice

 •  Filed under By Me, Life

There are too many easy choices.

I've noticed that retail stores and their vast volume of products seem to be on the rise. Every shopping trip turns into a "who buys all this?" while looking at the mountains of stock available. This isn't just about the products we can easily buy though. It seems now that we're even spoiled for choice in the experiences that we can have in life.

On Sunday I read a story about a silent fireworks display that was intended for babies and toddlers. After the show was finished parents complained that the fireworks were too loud. Hardly surprising given that fireworks by nature are loud.

The bugbear for me isn't the flawed logic of silent fireworks show, it's the availability of choice. We tend to do these things simply because we have the choice too. I'm sure most of us would consider taking our youngest children to a fireworks display but is there any benefit other than the fact that you can?

We're spoiled for choice and the element of resistance in that choice is being eroded away. Just because the decision to do something is easy, it doesn't mean that we should.

The Ideal Life

 •  Filed under Curtis McHale, Nicholas Bate, Life

Another great post by Curtis McHale. This time on what your ideal life would be.

Here's a hint. It's not lounging on a beach every day.

There is a problem with that question of how you’d spend your time, even though it’s a good starting point. Money isn’t really a predictor of happiness and an awesome life.

What is the "ideal life" anyway? by Curtis McHale.

Nicholas Bate sums it up another way which I rather like.

Chase quality of life, not standard of living. The former is what most of us actually want.

7x7 Money Management by Nicholas Bate

The Mailbox Effect

 •  Filed under Life, Cultural Offering

Kurt Harden continues to deliver life changing lessons from his own experiences.

My old communications professor, Raymond Tucker, explained the Mailbox Effect one day in class: “We, on some level or another, believe that one day we will go to the mailbox, open it, and pull out a letter which reads ‘Congratulations, your problems are solved. Because you are such a deserving person and have waited so patiently, we have enclosed a check for several million dollars and solved all of your problems. You’re welcome.’“

The Mailbox Effect by Cultural Offering